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Cosmopolitanism in Transnational Literary Studies: The Case of Religion, Secularism, and Migration
Start Date: 2/7/2015Start Time: 11:30 AM
End Date: 2/7/2015End Time: 1:00 PM

Event Description:

Susan Stanford Friedman, a recipient of Wayne C. Booth Award for Lifetime Achievement in Narrative Studies  (2009) teaches in the Departments of English and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she also directs the Institute for Research in the Humanities. She has published widely on modernism, feminist theory, migration, psychoanalysis, and world literatures. Her books include Mappings: Feminism and the Cultural Geographies of Encounter (Perkins Prize for Best Book in Narrative Studies, 1998), Penelope's Web: Gender, Modernity, H.D.'s Fiction (1990) and Psyche Reborn: The Emergence of H.D. (1987). A co-edited volume, Comparison: Theories, Approaches, Uses appeared in 2013. Planetary Modernisms: Provocations on Modernity Across Time is forthcoming in 2015, and she is at work on Sisters of Scheherazade: Religion, Diaspora, and Muslim Women’s Writing.

This paper explores transnational literary studies and questions of cultural translation by focusing on the entanglements of religion and secularism within the larger frame of migration studies, specifically the diasporic writing of two Muslim women writers, the Syrian-American writer Mohja Kahf, in The Girl with the Tangerine Scarf and the Turkish writer Elif Shafak, in The Bastard of Istanbul. The paper argues that religion and cosmopolitanism are not opposites. Rather, the transnational geographies of religion reveal that religion and secularism exist dialogically in every society and do not map onto East/West, tradition/modernity binaries.

This is a keynote lecture at the international conference Transnational Literature and Translation, Swarthmore College, February 6-7 2015.

For detailed program please see http://works.swarthmore.edu/transnational-lit

The conference is free and open to the public.

Location Information:
*Swarthmore College  (View Map)
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081

*Swarthmore College - Science Center

*Swarthmore College - Science Center
Room: Science Center 199 - Cunniff Hall
Contact Information:
Name: Jasmina Lukic
Phone: 610-957-6104
Email: jlukic1@swarthmore.edu
Event Sponsors
Provost’s Office, Alumni Relations Office, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Swarthmore College, and the Department of German and German Studies at Bryn Mawr College.
Open To
The Public

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