var response='success'; jQuery('#ad-event-feed-36351 .raweventdata').html("\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15611&information_id=42547&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003ePhys/Astr Colloquium: Thomas Baumgarte, Bowdoin College, ME\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e03/31/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e12:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e2:00 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003ePhysics and Astronomy Colloquium\r\nThomas Baumgarte\r\nWilliam R. Kenan Professor of Physics\r\nDepartment of Physics and Astronomy\r\nBowdoin College, ME\r\n\"Critical Gravitational Collapse to Rotating Black Holes\"\r\nCritical phenomena, i.e. the appearance of universal scaling laws and self-similarity in the vicinity of phase transitions, appear in different fields of physics and beyond. \u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nCritical phenomena in the gravitational collapse to black holes were first observed by Matt Choptuik about 25 years ago - a seminal discovery that launched a whole new field of research. Until recently, however, much of this research was restricted to spherical symmetry, and therefore could not account for effects that break this symmetry, in particular rotation. In this talk I will review the appearance of scaling laws and self-similarity close to the onset of black hole formation. I will then present new numerical relativity simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating perfect fluids, in the absence of spherical symmetry. \u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nThese simulations inform perturbative treatments of the problem, leading to the formulation of generalized scaling laws that take into account the role of angular momentum in the critical collapse to black holes.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003ePhysics & Astronomy, physics@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8258\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eScience Center : Science Center 199 - Cunniff Hall\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel, Public Events\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e03/31/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=14316&information_id=39355&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003eObservatory Open House\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e04/11/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e9:00 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e10:00 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003eThis event recurs on a custom schedule.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003eThe Physics and Astronomy department hosts a telescope open house on the second Tuesday of each month at the Peter van de Kamp Observatory on the roof of the Science Center. Directions are available at \u003ca href=\"http://www.swarthmore.edu/peter-van-de-kamp-observatory/directions\" target=\"blank\"\u003ewww.swarthmore.edu/peter-van-de-kamp-observatory/directions\u003c/a\u003e. The open house hours are 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. when it is standard time and 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. when it is daylight savings time. If the weather is bad, the open house will be cancelled and an announcement will be posted on the Physics and Astronomy department website.\r\nCheck \u003ca href=\"http://www.swarthmore.edu/physics\" target=\"blank\"\u003ewww.swarthmore.edu/physics\u003c/a\u003e the day of the open house if the weather is questionable.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003eCarolyn Warfel, physics@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8258\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eScience Center : Science Center Peter van de Kamp Observatory\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=3990\" border=\"0\" alt=\"observatory\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=3990&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"observatory\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e04/11/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15565&information_id=42452&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003ePhysics & Astronomy Colloquium - Tom Giblin\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e04/14/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e12:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e2:00 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003e\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nTom Giblin\r\nAssociate Professor of Physics\r\nDepartment of Physics\r\nKenyon College\r\n“Searching for the secrets of the non-linear Universe”\r\nWe have no evidence that general relativity is wrong; every precision test is a resounding confirmation of this elegant and powerful mathematical model. Trouble is: the greatest cosmological problems of our time (likely require) us to abandon general relativity. About 95% of the Universe remains a mystery whose solution evades our abilities. \u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nI will talk about how there may still be places in general relativity that have, until now, gone unexplored. Numerical simulations are a powerful tool that can model the complex non-linear issues of general relativity on cosmological scales. I will present progress that we have made toward modeling the late Universe in its full splendor and outline where there’s hope that we can start to tackle these great questions.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003ePhysics & Astronomy, physics@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8258\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eScience Center : Science Center 199 - Cunniff Hall\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e04/14/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e")