var response='success'; jQuery('#ad-event-feed-36356 .raweventdata').html("\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15598&information_id=42823&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003eTalk: The Environment and Miao Culture on China\u0027s Southwest Borderland\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e4:15 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003e\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 14px; font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003eChinese Miao (Hmong) scholar Mr. Bode Wang visits the Tri-Co for a week of activities \u003c/span\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 14px; font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003eon the environment, religions, livelihood, and political culture of the Miao people \u003c/span\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 14px; font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003eon China\u0027s southwest borderlands\u003c/span\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 14px; font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003e. The events occur in tandem with Professor Yonglin Jiang’s 360 course “The Environment on China’s Frontiers”. In addition to classroom visits and campus talks, each school will host an exhibition of photographs illuminating our understanding of the dynamic relationship between the environment and ethnic culture in the borderlands.\u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nMcCabe Library Atrium\u003c/span\u003e\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://photo.blog.sina.com.cn/wangbode6949\"\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 14px;\"\u003ehttp://photo.blog.sina.com.cn/wangbode6949\u003c/span\u003e\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/span\u003e\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-family: \u0027Avenir Book\u0027;\"\u003e \u003c/span\u003e\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c/p\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003ePamela Harris, pharris1@swarthmore.edu, (610) 690-2056\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eMcCabe Library : McCabe Lobby\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=4526\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Ancient Chinese Bridge - Bode Wang\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=4526&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Ancient Chinese Bridge - Bode Wang\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Arts & Culture, Exhibit, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel, Library, Public Events, Student Events\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003eSponsored by the Bi-Co East Asian Languages & Cultures Department; Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE); Swarthmore College Modern Languages & Literatures, Chinese Section and the Libraries\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e03/23/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15760&information_id=42903&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003eThe Afterlives of Torture - Executive Power versus International Law in the Age of Trump\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e03/28/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e4:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e6:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003eThis event recurs daily until 3/28/2017.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003eLisa Hajjar is a professor of sociology at the University of California – Santa Barbara. Her publications include Courting Conflict: The Israeli Military Court System in the West Bank and Gaza (University of California Press, 2005) and Torture: A Sociology of Violence and Human Rights (Routledge 2013). She is currently working on a book tentatively titled The War in Court: The Legal Campaign against US Torture in the “War on Terror.” Her work focuses mainly on issues relating to law and conflict, military courts and occupations, human rights and international law, and torture and targeted killing. \r\n\r\nDonald Trump ran for president and won on a platform that included the pledge to bring back waterboarding and other torture techniques. Within days of taking office, he signed executive orders that would indicate his intention to make good on that pledge. The question of whether the United States could or should resurrect a torture policy has become, again, a topic of fierce debate. In this talk, I will engage these contemporary developments and debates by exploring how the post-9/11 torture program instituted by the Bush administration continues to haunt national politics and international relations, despite that the program was cancelled by President Obama. I use the concept of “afterlives” to consider three sets of issues: First, how the secrecy that continues to shroud the US record on torture serves to fuel disputes about whether torture “works”; second, how the lack of accountability for those officials responsible for torture has reinforced confusion about US obligations under international law; and third, how assertions about executive power and prerogatives by the two previous administrations have paved the way for President Trump to pursue his goal of canceling the cancellation of torture.\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003eRose Maio, rmaio1@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8106\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eKohlberg : Kohlberg, Scheuer Room, Kohlberg\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=4535\" border=\"0\" alt=\"The Afterlives of Torture\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=4535&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"The Afterlives of Torture\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e03/28/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15743&information_id=42837&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003e“Religion, Inheritance, and Universalism: Intellectual Histories of South Asia”\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e03/30/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e4:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e6:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003e\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nThough research into the histories of science, liberalism, and nationalism hold multi-faceted reference points in the discipline, histories of intellectuals in conversation with the history of decolonization, with reference to the history of the twentieth century in a global intellectual history, have yet to appear. \u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nThrough engagement with the Bengali Intellectuals Oral History Project (BIOH), this talk explores the literal and ideational itineraries of intellectuals through the register of the “East” in Banglaphone (West Bengal, India, and East Bengal, Pakistan from 1947 to 1971, and Bangladesh from 1971 onward) thought in the twentieth century. \u003cbr /\u003e\r\n\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nAt stake for this research is the inheritance of religious reform, particularly through the Brahma Samaj, an early nineteenth century social reform organization, within intellectual histories of South Asia. Within such a context, the paper probes the role of Islam as a source and inspiration for change in the Eastern portions of Bengal, inclusive of the East Pakistan period (1947 – 1971) and early Bangladesh period (1971 – 2000).\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003eRose Maio, rmaio1@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8106\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eKohlberg : Kohlberg, Scheuer Room,\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=4528\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Presidency College, Kolkata, India, Francis Firth, c. 1860\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=4528&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Presidency College, Kolkata, India, Francis Firth, c. 1860\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel, Public Events\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e03/30/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15603&information_id=42530&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003eWhy do protests fail? A Talk by Micah White \u002704\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e03/30/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e7:00 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e8:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003eProtest is undeniably cool again. And yet, if we evaluate recent protests by their outcome, not their rhetoric, it is increasingly clear that contemporary forms of activism are resulting in diminishing effectiveness. Despite their size, their sophistication and their speed, the last decade of social protests have largely failed to achieve their desired social change objectives. If protest as we know it is broken, how do we fix it?\r\nIn this lecture by Micah White, the co-creator of Occupy Wall Street and author of THE END OF PROTEST, we will evaluate various theories for why contemporary protests are failing. Is it a lack of demands? Police repression? Absence of leadership? Or something deeper? Our goal will be to develop a general theory of protest failure grounded in the concrete experience of contemporary activism. Guiding our collective inquiry will be the hope that understanding protest failure will better equip today’s democracy activists for creating positive social change in their lifetimes.\r\n•••\r\nMICAH WHITE \u002704 is the lifelong activist who co-created Occupy Wall Street, a global social movement, while an editor of Adbusters magazine. While at Swarthmore, he co-founded one of the nation\u0027s first student anti-war organizations. Widely recognized as a pioneer of social movement creation, Micah White has been profiled by The New Yorker, The Guardian and Esquire has named him one of the most influential young thinkers alive today. Micah is the author of The End of Protest: A New Playbook for Revolution. Learn more at micahmwhite.com\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003eAdina Spertus-Melhus, aspertu1@swarthmore.edu, 224-688-7272\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eScience Center : Science Center 101 - Chang Hou Hall\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=4533\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Micah White \u002704\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=4533&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"Micah White \u002704\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Intercultural Center, Lang Center, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel, Library, Student Events\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e03/30/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"feedevent\"\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"title\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=15751&information_id=42853&type=&syndicate=syndicate\" target=\"blank\" \u003eBrexit, Class, Racism\u003c/a\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"regspaces\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"enddate\"\u003e04/06/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"starttime\"\u003e4:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"endtime\"\u003e6:30 PM\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"recurrence\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"description\"\u003e\u003cb\u003eBrexit, Class, Racism\u003c/b\u003e\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nA talk to be given by Brendan McGeever\u003cbr /\u003e\r\nBirkbeck, University of London\u003cp /\u003e\r\nThis talk offers a conjunctural analysis of Brexit and its racist aftermath. It explores how the campaign to Leave the European Union was secured through two interlocking visions. The first was an imperial longing to restore Britain’s place in the world as primus inter pares that occludes any coming to terms with the corrosive legacies of colonial conquest; the second, an insular narrative of island retreat from a ‘globalizing’ world that is no longer recognizably ‘British’. The talk will conclude by outlining some resources of hope that could potentially help to negotiate the current emergency.\u003cbr /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"contact\"\u003eJen Moore, history@swarthmore.edu, 610-328-8135\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"location\"\u003eTrotter : Trotter 203\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"image\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&id=4532\" border=\"0\" alt=\"A bloody Union Jack\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"thumbnail\"\u003e\u003cimg src=\"http://calendar.swarthmore.edu/calendar/displaymedia.aspx?whatToDo=picture&thumbnail=thumbnail&thumbnailwidth=100&id=4532&square=N\" border=\"0\" alt=\"A bloody Union Jack\" /\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"category\"\u003eAcademic Departments & Programs, Lang Center, Lecture/Talk/ Reading/ Panel, Public Events\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"extrainfo\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"sponsor\"\u003e\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"opento\"\u003eThe Public\u003c/div\u003e\u003cdiv class=\"startdate\"\u003e04/06/2017\u003c/div\u003e\u003c/div\u003e")